Tag Archives: Craig Ferguson

Missed It: Ferguson’s Halloween Clip

Craig Ferguson had Neil Gaiman, Amanda Palmer, Stephen Merritt and Moby play a cover of The Rocky Horror Picture Show‘s Science Fiction Double Feature on his Halloween episode. It was hilarious how the crowd cheered when Gaiman plays a few piano notes, like parents for a child at a recital. Also interesting to see Palmer work the crowd quite unlike any other musician has ever on The Late Late Show.

This was in addition to another fun Ferguson musical opening number.

TV: Jimmy Fallon Impresses Me

My loyalty to Craig Ferguson is unceasing. But based on this clip from last night’s Late Night With Jimmy Fallon, it’s a good thing that with my Tivo dial tuner I can record both Craig and Jimmy. Pop culturally, the NY Times Dave Itzkoff is dead right when he describes last night’s full-scale production (My idol Letterman never pulled off anything of this scale in his prime) as the Finnegan’s Wake of TV Parodies.

My one concern is–how long can Fallon put this much effort into one hour before he burns out or has to scale back? I hope I’m wrong and he maintains this quality, because if he does he may have the formula for late night success.

Missed It: Stephen Fry on Craig Ferguson

The week I was on vacation, away from CBS TV, Craig Ferguson pulled off an experimental episode of his Late Late Show. On the February 23 episode (which unfortunately is no longer archived on the CBS website), after the opening monologue he interviewed the British actor and writer Stephen Fry for the length of the whole show without a studio audience. That element of the show hearkened back to the format done by original Late Late Show host, Tom Snyder, who always had done the show without a studio audience.

The opening monologue, which I linked to above, reveals the transparency in which Ferguson consistently conducts the show. He conceded that he was slightly bothered by the dust-up on NBC involving Jay Leno and Conan O’Brien. Coming out of that, it got Ferguson thinking about the dynamics of his television show and itching to try a show without a studio audience (an aspect of his normal show that he fully concedes he appreciates and feeds off of on a regular basis).

If anyone doubted his being inspired by Snyder’s old format, Ferguson eliminated that possibility with the closing line of the monlogue, quoting Snyder’s traditional line to his audience: “Fire up a colortini, sit back, relax, and watch the pictures, now, as they fly through the air.”

CBS did not post the entire episode, but I’m sure if you look through You Tube, you might find snippets here or there. But for now, I provide you the five-minute snippet CBS was kind enough to post. Should I find out they will be replaying the episode, I will try to post a note here or on my Twitter account (TalkingwithTim).

One last thought on this experiment, to echo Entertainment Weekly’s Ken Tucker, who wrote a great analysis of this episode: “I vote for one edition a month of The Late Late Show in this format.”

Things I Almost Missed from December: TMBG on Ferguson

So, I’m finally catching up on some missed Craig Ferguson episodes that were still residing on my Tivo list. Back in mid-December, They Might Be Giants (TMBG) were on the show, promoting their latest children’s release (CD & DVD), Here Comes the Science.

And much to my delight, they played one of my alltime favorite TMBG tunes, Why Does the Sun Shine? (The Sun is a Mass of Incandescent Gas).

Enjoy.

Bless ya, Craig Ferguson…& Other Stuff

I’m not a huge Ringo Starr fan, but I really have to tip my hat to Craig Ferguson for devoting his entire January 24 episode to the Beatles former drummer (who is currently making the rounds with Eurythmics’ Dave Stewart as part of his band). The last time I can remember an entire show devoting its focus to one act would have been David Letterman’s final Warren Zevon show in 2002. Ferguson won me over a few years ago when he devoted an entire monologue to eulogizing his father . CBS and Worldwide Pants kindly archive Ferguson’s monologues here. Ferguson has this unfettered enthusiasm about his job that is as engaging and genuine as Letterman was in his 12:30 am slot back at NBC. This past Thursday night’s show was a prime example of why I hope Ferguson never gets sick of his late night gig.

In college, one of those writers that engaged my interest and reinforced my decision to get a degree in English Literature was Walker Percy. Since his death in 1990, I’ve often worried that the level of respect for his work would dwindle (as it invariable does with some authors after their demise). That worry seems a tad needless when I run across items like this one at the New York TimesReading Room blog.

Continue reading Bless ya, Craig Ferguson…& Other Stuff

Bless ya, Craig Ferguson…& Other Stuff

I’m not a huge Ringo Starr fan, but I really have to tip my hat to Craig Ferguson for devoting his entire January 24 episode to the Beatles former drummer (who is currently making the rounds with Eurythmics’ Dave Stewart as part of his band). The last time I can remember an entire show devoting its focus to one act would have been David Letterman’s final Warren Zevon show in 2002. Ferguson won me over a few years ago when he devoted an entire monologue to eulogizing his father . CBS and Worldwide Pants kindly archive Ferguson’s monologues here. Ferguson has this unfettered enthusiasm about his job that is as engaging and genuine as Letterman was in his 12:30 am slot back at NBC. This past Thursday night’s show was a prime example of why I hope Ferguson never gets sick of his late night gig.

In college, one of those writers that engaged my interest and reinforced my decision to get a degree in English Literature was Walker Percy. Since his death in 1990, I’ve often worried that the level of respect for his work would dwindle (as it invariable does with some authors after their demise). That worry seems a tad needless when I run across items like this one at the New York TimesReading Room blog.

Continue reading Bless ya, Craig Ferguson…& Other Stuff